October 2019

  • 9
  • Wednesday, 9. October 2019 - 19:00
    TALK
    “One just has to collect everything”: African Fragments in Colonial Collecting Institutions, Resistance and Restitution.
    Dag Henrichsen, Basler Afrika Bibliographien

    TALK





    “One just has to collect everything”: African Fragments in Colonial Collecting Institutions, Resistance and Restitution.


    Was it really necessary to collect everything? Colonial collecting institutions such as museums and archives were once characterised by utopias as much as they were by their enormous accumulations of objects and documents. Today they assemble fragments that are politically significant due to their colonial appropriation histories and because they are objects of restitution claims between nations.Which background stories can be told from the perspective of the societies of origin, from a time before these artistic and cultural artefacts and human remains became fragmented? In this talk, Dag Henrichsen considers current developments in the Namibian societies of origin to locate the current restitution debate in history and emphasise the significance of colonial collecting archives themselves as historical sources.


    Dr Dag Henrichsen has been based at Basler Afrika Bibliographien since 1995. Currently he is engaged in setting up a department on academic relationships and special projects. He has authored numerous publications on Namibian history and the history of African (audio-visual) archives and collections. Moreover, he teaches on a regular basis in the history department at the University of Basel.



    Weltkulturen Labor, Schaumainkai 37
    5€ / 2,50€

     
  • 23
  • 26
  • 27
  • Wednesday, 23. October 2019 - 19:00
    EXHIBITION OPENING
    “WORLDS IN MOTION. Narrating Migration”
    EXHIBITION OPENING

    The Weltkulturen Museum is delighted to invite you and your friends to the opening of the exhibition “WORLDS IN MOTION. Narrating Migration”.


    People have always been on the move, all around the world. As they move, they also take with them their lifestyles, language, music, and arts and crafts. Much of what is reputedly ‘authentic’ for a culture turns out, at second glance, to be an ‘import’. Starting from its own collections, the Weltkulturen Museum raises associative questions highlighting how the world’s diversity of cultures has always existed in a process of exchange. From historical settlement movements, labour migration or globalisation – people and their diverse cultures have always been in a process of constant exchange. Is migration really only a reaction to or a cause of problems – or far more a key driver for new forms of community in a constantly changing world?


    With speeches by Dr. Ina Hartwig (Deputy Mayor in Charge of Culture, Frankfurt am Main)and Dr. Eva Ch. Raabe (Director at the Weltkulturen Museum). Greetings from the artist collective Teru (Co-Curators MAHINA, Netherlands) and musical performances by Bridges – Music connects (Frankfurt am Main).


    Artists and participants:
    Adams Bodomo, Behrouz Boochani and Arash Kamali Sarvestani, Artist Collective Teru, Shahram Entekhabi, Edzard Herlyn and Thomas Hoeren, Junges Schauspiel Frankfurt, Karinding Keos, Phyllis Kiehl, Ella Knorz, Mansuela, Gora Mbengue, Yasemin Niephaus, José Oliveira, participants of the workshop „stories that matter“, Rajery and 3MA, Safransirup, Nazanin Sahamizadeh, Wiparat Sukatorn, Felix Schwarz, Takayuki Tamura, Daniel Traub with Wu Yong Fu and Zeng Xian Fang, Cliff Whiting


    WHAT DO I SEE? Find out more about the wood sculpture on the exhibition poster here.


    Follow us under #WorldsInMotion on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter!


    Find further information about the exhibition here.


    Exhibition dates: 24rd October 2019 - 30th August 2020



    Weltkulturen Museum, Schaumainkai 29

     
  • Saturday, 26. October 2019 -
    15:00 to 17:00

    WORKSHOP WITH EXHIBITION TOUR
    Satourday: “Worlds in Motion”
    WORKSHOP WITH EXHIBITION TOUR

    Satourday: “Worlds in Motion”


    People have always been on the move, taking with them much of their own cultures. In a visit to the exhibition “Worlds in Motion. Narrating Migration”, we look at how the influence of different cultures has changed and shaped not just the world, but all of us.


    Find further information about the exhibition here.



    For children aged six and above. Free. Registration required.
    Weltkulturen Museum, Schaumainkai 29

     
  • Sunday, 27. October 2019 - 15:00
    CURATOR'S GUIDED TOUR
    “WORLDS IN MOTION. Narrating Migration”
    With Matthias Claudius Hofmann (curator Oceania)
    CURATOR'S GUIDED TOUR

    “WORLDS IN MOTION. Narrating Migration”
    With Matthias Claudius Hofmann (curator Oceania)


    People have always been on the move, all around the world. As they move, they also take with them their lifestyles, language, music, and arts and crafts. Much of what is reputedly ‘authentic’ for a culture turns out, at second glance, to be an ‘import’. Starting from its own collections, the Weltkulturen Museum raises associative questions highlighting how the world’s diversity of cultures has always existed in a process of exchange. From historical settlement movements, labour migration or globalisation – people and their diverse cultures have always been in a process of constant exchange. Is migration really only a reaction to or a cause of problems – or far more a key driver for new forms of community in a constantly changing world?


    Artists and participants:
    Adams Bodomo, Behrouz Boochani and Arash Kamali Sarvestani, Artist Collective Teru, Shahram Entekhabi, Edzard Herlyn and Thomas Hoeren, Junges Schauspiel Frankfurt, Karinding Keos, Phyllis Kiehl, Ella Knorz, Mansuela, Gora Mbengue, Yasemin Niephaus, José Oliveira, participants of the workshop „stories that matter“, Rajery und 3MA, Safransirup, Nazanin Sahamizadeh, Wiparat Sukatorn, Felix Schwarz, Takayuki Tamura, Daniel Traub with Wu Yong Fu and Zeng Xian Fang, Cliff Whiting



    €7 / €3,50. Costs of tour included in admission fee.
    Weltkulturen Museum, Schaumainkai 29

     
  • 30
  • Wednesday, 30. October 2019 - 18:00
    CURATOR'S GUIDED TOUR
    “WORLDS IN MOTION. Narrating Migration”
    With Leonie Neumann (research assistant in Visual Anthropology)
    CURATOR'S GUIDED TOUR

    “WORLDS IN MOTION. Narrating Migration”
    With Leonie Neumann (research assistant in Visual Anthropology)


    People have always been on the move, all around the world. As they move, they also take with them their lifestyles, language, music, and arts and crafts. Much of what is reputedly ‘authentic’ for a culture turns out, at second glance, to be an ‘import’. Starting from its own collections, the Weltkulturen Museum raises associative questions highlighting how the world’s diversity of cultures has always existed in a process of exchange. From historical settlement movements, labour migration or globalisation – people and their diverse cultures have always been in a process of constant exchange. Is migration really only a reaction to or a cause of problems – or far more a key driver for new forms of community in a constantly changing world?


    Artists and participants:
    Adams Bodomo, Behrouz Boochani and Arash Kamali Sarvestani, Artist Collective Teru, Shahram Entekhabi, Edzard Herlyn and Thomas Hoeren, Junges Schauspiel Frankfurt, Karinding Keos, Phyllis Kiehl, Ella Knorz, Mansuela, Gora Mbengue, Yasemin Niephaus, José Oliveira, participants of the workshop „stories that matter“, Rajery und 3MA, Safransirup, Nazanin Sahamizadeh, Wiparat Sukatorn, Felix Schwarz, Takayuki Tamura, Daniel Traub with Wu Yong Fu and Zeng Xian Fang, Cliff Whiting



    €7 / €3,50. Costs of tour included in admission fee.
    Weltkulturen Museum, Schaumainkai 29

     
    Wednesday, 30. October 2019 - 18:30
    PRESENTATION OF THE EXHIBITION DOCUMENTATION AND DISCUSSION
    “Bought. Collected. Looted? How things came into the museum”
    at the Historisches Museum Frankfurt
    PRESENTATION OF THE EXHIBITION DOCUMENTATION AND DISCUSSION




    “Bought. Collected. Looted? How things came into the museum”


    How did ancestor figures from Nias off the western coast of Sumatra enter the European art market in the early twentieth century? Why could the museum buy objects rather ‘cheaply’ in Paris and Amsterdam in the early 1940s? Is a weapon belt from South Africa war booty?


    These are just some of the questions arising from a critical review of the Weltkulturen Museum’s collection. To specifically address these issues, the exhibition “COLLECTED. BOUGHT. LOOTED? Case studies fro ma Colonial and National Socialist Context” from August 2018 to January 2019 presented a number of case studies to highlight collecting practices in the colonial context and under the Nazi regime.


    The cause for the exhibition was the presentation of the exhibition „Legalisierter Raub. Der Fiskus und die Ausplünderung der Juden in Hessen 1933-1945“ of the Fritz Bauer Institute at the Historisches Museum Frankfurt. The Jüdisches Museum, the Museum Angewandte Kunst and the Weltkulturen Museum joined the project and five exhibitions and a joint programme emerged.


    At the event, the curators present the exhibition documentation and discuss the importance of a long-term and intense research on the provenance of museum objects with Meike Hopp (chairwoman of the AK Provenienzforschung).



    Historisches Museum Frankfurt, Leopold Sonnemann-Saal, Saalhof 1, 60311 Frankfurt am Main
    4€ / 2€