May 2021

  • Thursday, 1. April 2021 to Sunday, 30. January 2022
    GREEN SKY, BLUE GRASS. COLOUR CODING WORLDS
    Our world(s) are full of colours, but not every culture sees things in the same way.
    ***TEMPORARILY CLOSED***
    Δ GREEN SKY, BLUE GRASS. COLOUR CODING WORLDS

    ***TEMPORARILY CLOSED***

    You can find our online events here.

    Our world is full of colour, but do all cultures see it in the same way? While the scientific basis for perception is identical for everyone, light waves can’t really explain how we name our impressions of colour, the number (and kind) of categories we divide these colours into, or the meanings and associations we ascribe to them. These can sometimes differ enormously depending on the language and culture involved.

    It all means that colour is not necessarily universal. As an example, the meaning of the Japanese word ao is not identical to the English term blue. This is also the case with midori, which is quite distinct from green. Thus, Japanese poetry can absolutely describe a “green sky” and “blue grass” – the European way of seeing things is turned upside down.

    With around 200 exhibits from the collections of the Weltkulturen Museum, including objects from New Guinea, Polynesia, the Amazon region, East Africa, Tibet and Java, the exhibition examines the wide range of contextual meanings for colour as a cultural phenomenon.

    A central theme in this exhibition addresses the diverse cultural concepts associated with colour, because colour codes worlds: colours are often associated with manifold social and cosmological notions that help people find their way in the world, making sense of it and regulating how they live with each other. Exploring the meanings of the different understandings of colour means viewing cultural relationships in a new light, which in turn allows us to discover other worldviews.

    1. Accompanying publication
      The exhibition will be accompanied by an in-depth catalogue called “Green Sky, Blue Grass”, which includes a lavish selection of visual material. The interdisciplinary articles in this publication examine the themes of the exhibition in greater detail and present thought-provoking ideas about colour as a cultural phenomenon.

      Including scholarly contributions by Tomi Bartole, Eystein Dahl, Roger Erb, Frauke Gathof, Vanessa von Gliszczynski, Brigitta Hauser-Schäublin, Matthias Claudius Hofmann, Arno Holl, Eric Huntington, Olaf L. Müller, Eva Ch. Raabe, Gustaaf Verswijver as well as Chantal Courtois in conversation with René Fuerst.

      The catalogue is published in German and English by Kerber Verlag.
    1. Curators
      Head curator: Matthias Claudius Hofmann
      Co-curators: Tomi Batole, Roger Erb, Vanessa von Gliszczynski, Arno Holl
    2. Adress, Opening hours, Prices
      Weltkulturen Museum
      Schaumainkai 29
      60594 Frankfurt am Main

      €7 / reduced €3.50
      Free admission for children and teenagers under the age of 18

      Opening times: Tue.–Sun. 11am – 6 pm , Wed. 11 am – 8 pm      

       






    schließen
  • Thursday, 29. April 2021 to Sunday, 18. July 2021
    HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT. From Being Rendered Invisible and Becoming Visible
    The exhibition examines how through multiple perspectives and approaches a space in the museum can be created, that allows for critically dealing with colonialism and its aftermaths up to the present day.
    Δ HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT. From Being Rendered Invisible and Becoming Visible

    ***TEMPORARILY CLOSED***

    You can find our online events here.

    Museums store, manage and transmit knowledge. But what knowledge is stored and communicated - and by whom? What is excluded or overridden?

    “Hidden in Plain Sight” examines how through multiple perspectives and approaches a space in the museum can be created, that allows for critically dealing with colonialism and its aftermaths up to the present day. The exhibition shows how a decolonial education practice can open up new points of view within the museum.

    The exhibition deals with current topics such as the history and origins of artefacts as well as interrogates scientific classification systems. In dialogue with works by contemporary artists, the following questions are discussed: Which events and people are absent in texts and in libraries? How many social privileges remain invisible? Which histories are excluded in the dominant historical narratives and are therefore not inscribed in the collective memory?

    “Hidden in Plain Sight” deliberately pursues the ambitious goal of creating productive spaces for thinking about new forms of social coexistence and dialogue.

    1. Curators
      Curated by Julia Albrecht und Stephanie Endter, with a curatorial contribution by Lea Steinkampf.
    2. Participating artists
      FrauHerr Meko (Darmstadt, Deutschland), Kitso Lynn Lelliott (Johannesburg, Südafrika), Ema Tavola (Auckland, Neuseeland), Joana Tischkau (Frankfurt/Berlin, Deutschland)

      With works and objects from the collection of the Weltkulturen Museum, amongst others works by Shan Goshorn (Tulsa, USA)
    3. Adress, Opening hours, Prices
      Weltkulturen Museum
      Schaumainkai 37
      60594 Frankfurt

      €3.50 / reduced €1.50
      Children and young adults up to 18 years free

      Opening times: Tues – Sun, 11am – 6pm, Wed, 11am – 8pm




    schließen